Spring 2023

Culture: Archaeology, History, Literature, Philosophy, etc.

GREEK CIVILIZATION (CLAS 101)

  • CLAS 101.01: MWF 11:00–11:50: Dr. Andrew Alwine
  • CLAS 101.02: MWF 1:00–1:50: Dr. Samuel Flores

Introduction to the world of Ancient Greece, from the Minoans to the Hellenistic kingdoms. We will read multiple primary sources (poets, philosophers, playwrights, etc.) as we survey the cities and cultures of the Greek world. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.)

CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY (CLAS 103)

  • CLAS 103.01: MWF 12:00–12:50: Dr. Richard Gilder
  • CLAS 103.02: MWF 2:00–2:50: Dr. Blanche McCune

Gods, Goddesses, and Monsters—learn about the Greeks and Romans through the stories they told. We’ll study literature and art to understand how people of the ancient Mediterranean worked and worshipped, lived and died, loved and played. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.)

INTRODUCTION TO CLASSICAL ARCHAEOLOGY (CLAS 104)

  • CLAS 104.01: ONLINE (asynchronous): Dr. James Newhard

An introduction to the archaeology of the Classical world, emphasizing the development of archaeology as a discipline and issues such as the recording and interpretation of evidence, the relationship between historical and archaeological events, the integration of archaeology with other forms of evidence, and the use of classical civilization and archaeology in defining the modern world. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors, Archaeology major/minor.) 

HISTORY OF THE CLASSICAL WORLD (CLAS 105)

  • CLAS 105.01: TR 9:25–10:40: Dr. Allison Kidd

A survey of major developments in the history of Ancient Greece and Rome. Proceeding in chronological order, the course covers more than 2,000 years of history, from the development of Bronze Age civilizations and continuing through the fall of the Roman Empire. Drawing upon diverse primary sources, class sessions will explore developments in political, social, economic, cultural and intellectual history. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Pre-modern History, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.)

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY IN GREEK & LATIN (CLAS 111)

  • CLAS 111.01: ONLINE (asynchronous): Ms. Megan Alwine
  • CLAS 111.02: ONLINE (asynchronous): Ms. Megan Alwine
  • CLAS 111.03: ONLINE (asynchronous): Ms. Megan Alwine
  • CLAS 111.04: ONLINE (asynchronous): Ms. Megan Alwine

A study of the technical vocabulary of the medical professions through an analysis of Latin and Greek elements in English words and the underlying etymological principles. (Prerequisite accepted course for MUSC.)

ANCIENT ROME (HIST 232)

  • HIST 232.01: TR 8:00–9:15: Dr. Jennifer Gerrish

The city of Rome grew from a tiny settlement on the Palatine Hill to a mighty empire stretching from Britain to Babylon. This course examines Rome's history from its foundation in 753 BCE to the death of Rome's first Christian emperor in 337 CE. We will explore not just the history of Rome, but also the evidence: how do we know what we think we know about Rome? (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors, History major/minor.)

SLAVERY AND RACISM IN GREECE AND ROME (CLAS 215)

  • CLAS 215.01: MW 3:25-4:40: Dr. Samuel Flores

This course studies the institution of slavery and the concepts of race and racism in ancient Greece and Rome, and their legacy in the modern world. We will look at both antiquity and modernity from multiple perspectives, using archaeological, historical, literary, and philosophical sources. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors)

AEGEAN PREHISTORY (CLAS 223)

  • CLAS 223.01: TR 10:50–12:05: Dr. James Newhard

This course introduces the cultures and civilizations of the Aegean Basin from the Palaeolithic through Late Bronze Age (approx. 25,000-1,200 B.C.), with particular focus placed upon the Bronze Age phases (c 3.200-1,200 B.C.). The course combines anthropological and archaeological perspectives. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors, Archaeology majors/minors)  

CITY OF ROME: MONUMENTS AND MEMORY (CLAS 303)

  • CLAS 303.01: TR 12:15–1:30: Dr. Allison Kidd

Using the city of Rome as a case study, this course explores ‘monumentality’ as an ancient Roman concept intimately connected with Roman history and the preservation of memory. Students will engage a rich body of surviving primary sources, including ancient literary and material artifacts, to examine how the monuments of Rome served as tangible vehicles that not only recalled and validated past narratives but also influenced contemporary and future action. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors, Archaeology majors/minors.) 

ALEXANDER THE GREAT (CLAS 303 / HIST 370)

  • CLAS 303.02 / HIST 370: MWF 9:00–9:50: Dr. Andrew Alwine

A survey of the rise of Macedonia under Philip II and his son, Alexander III (“the great”). Over a period of two generations, the Macedonian empire expanded to include territories from Greece and Egypt to Afghanistan and India. This course will also cover the history of Alexander’s successors, who fought over the “Hellenistic” world. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors, History majors/minors) 

 


Latin

ELEMENTARY LATIN (LATN 101)

  • LATN 101.01: MWF 1:00-1:50: Dr. Blanche McCune
  • LATN 101.02: TW 9:25–10:40: Dr. Noelle Zeiner-Carmichael

Introduces the fundamental grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of Latin with emphasis on reading comprehension. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.) 

ELEMENTARY LATIN (LATN 102.01-02)

  • LATN 102.01: MWF 10:00-10:50: Dr. James Lohmar
  • LATN 102.02: TR 12:15-1:30: Dr. Jennifer Gerrish

Introduces the fundamental grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of Latin with emphasis on reading comprehension. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

 

INTERMEDIATE LATIN (LATN 201)

  • LATN 201.01: MWF 11:00–11:50: Dr. James Lohmar
  • LATN 201.02: MWF 12:00–12:50: Dr. James Lohmar

Completes the introduction to basic Latin, developing comprehension in reading and writing. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

INTERMEDIATE LATIN (LATN 202)

  • LATN 202.01: TR 1:40–2:55: Dr. Blanche McCune
  • LATN 202.01: TR 10:50–12:05: Dr. Noelle Zeiner-Carmichael
  • LATN 202.01: MWF 10:00–10:50: Dr. Richard Gilder

Completes the introduction to basic Latin, developing comprehension in reading and writing. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

STATIUS (LATN 390.01)

  •  LATN 390.01: TR 1:40-2:55: Dr. Noelle Zeiner-Carmichael

Students will read selections from Statius’ Silvae, a collection of “spontaneous” poems celebrating not only Emperor Domitian, but everyday people of Flavian Rome. Weddings, funerals, politics, illness, villas, nature, monuments, and dining, among other topics, offer something of interest for everyone. Special attention will be given to Statius’ style and the cultural significance of his poetry. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.)

LUCAN (LATN 390.02)

  •  LATN 390.02: MWF 3:00–3:50: Dr. James Lohmar

Readings from Lucan's Bellum Civile. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.)


Ancient Greek

ELEMENTARY ANCIENT GREEK (GREK 102)

  • GREK 102.01: MWF 12:00-12:50: Dr. Samuel Flores

Introduces the fundamental grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of Ancient Greek with emphasis on reading comprehension. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

INTERMEDIATE ANCIENT GREEK (GREK 202)

  • GREK 202.01: MWF 12:00–12:50: Dr. Scott Hemmenway

Transition from grammar to reading texts. In this course, we will read Plato’s Apology in its entirety and in its original language. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

HOMERIC HYMNS (GREK 390) 

  • GREK 321.01: TR 10:50–12:05: Dr. Jennifer Gerrish

In this course we will read the four "long" Homeric Hymns: to Demeter, Apollo, Hermes, and Aphrodite. (Counts for A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.)