Fall 2021

Culture: Archaeology, History, Literature, Philosophy, etc.

ROMAN CIVILIZATION (CLAS 102)

  • CLAS 102.01: MWF 11:00–11:50: Dr. Allison Sterrett-Krause*
  • CLAS 102.02: TR 1:40–2:55: Dr. Noelle Zeiner-Carmichael

A survey of Roman literature, art, society, and history, from the Etruscan period to the era of Constantine, with an emphasis on the Augustan age. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.) 

*CLAS 102.01 is freshman-only section, part of a First Year Experience Learning Community in partnership with LATN 101.01.

CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY (CLAS 103)

  • CLAS 103.01: MWF 2:00–2:50 (synchronous online): Dr. Michael Overholt

Gods, Goddesses, and Monsters—learn about the Greeks and Romans through the stories they told. We’ll study literature and art to understand how people of the ancient Mediterranean worked and worshipped, lived and died, loved and played. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.) 

HISTORY OF THE CLASSICAL WORLD (CLAS 105)

  • CLAS 105.01: TR 9:25–10:40 (synchronous online): Dr. Allison Kidd

A survey of major developments in the history of Ancient Greece and Rome. Proceeding in chronological order, the course covers more than 2,000 years of history, from the development of Bronze Age civilizations and continuing through the fall of the Roman Empire. Drawing upon diverse primary sources, class sessions will explore developments in political, social, economic, cultural and intellectual history.(Counts for Gen. Ed. Pre-modern History, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.) 

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY IN GREEK & LATIN (CLAS 111)

  • CLAS 111.01: ONLINE (asynchronous): Mrs. Megan Alwine
  • CLAS 111.02: ONLINE (asynchronous): Mrs. Megan Alwine
  • CLAS 111.03 (Express I): ONLINE (asynchronous): Mrs. Megan Alwine
  • CLAS 111.05: ONLINE (asynchronous): Mrs. Megan Alwine

A study of the technical vocabulary of the medical professions through an analysis of Latin and Greek elements in English words and the underlying etymological principles. (Prerequisite accepted course for MUSC.)

CONTEMPORARY RESEARCH ON THE MEDITERRANEAN WORLD (CLAS 200)

  • CLAS 200.01: MW 3:25–4:40: Dr. James Newhard

This course explores the nature of research in the Mediterranean World, which is grounded in the study of Greco-Roman civilization. Students develop skills necessary for developing and crafting persuasive arguments: analyzing ancient evidence; evaluating scholarly arguments; writing in a process that includes invention, drafting, and revision: and documenting evidence appropriately. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, Classics majors/minors.)

SLAVERY AND RACISM IN GREECE AND ROME (CLAS 215)

  • CLAS 215.01: TR 12:15-1:30: Dr. Samuel Flores

This course studies the institution of slavery and the concepts of race and racism in ancient Greece and Rome, and their legacy in the modern world. We will look at both antiquity and modernity from multiple perspectives, using archaeological, historical, literary, and philosophical sources. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors)

HISTORY OF ANCIENT GREECE (HIST 231)

  • HIST 231.01: TR 8:00–9:15: Dr. Samuel Flores

Greek civilization from its beginnings to Alexander the Great. Emphasis on political, economic, social, and intellectual movements. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors, History major/minor.)

HAPPINESS, LOVE, DESIRE: A MILLENIUM OF CONVERSATION (HONS 225)

  • HONS 225.02: MWF 1:00-1:50: Dr. Blanche McCune

What does a happy life look like? The ancient Greek and Roman authors didn't always agree about the answer, but they started a conversation that is still going on today. Reading in this course will include Homer, Sappho, Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle, Lucretius, Horace, Vergil, and Augustine of Hippo.

STATE FORMATION IN THE MEDITERRANEAN WORLD (CLAS 320)

  • CLAS 320.01: TR 10:50–12:05: Dr. James Newhard           

This course is a discussion of how complex states developed within the Mediterranean World. The study of these transformations provides for a better understanding of socio-political systems and the processes by which societies form. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors, Archaeology major/minor, Sustainability-Related Course.)

RESEARCH SEMINAR: POMPEII (CLAS 401)

  • CLAS 401.01: MW 2:00–3:15: Dr. Allison Sterrett-Krause

A devastating eruption of Mt. Vesuvius obliterated the Roman town of Pompeii in 79 CE. When the site was rediscovered more than a thousand years later, excavators found a nearly intact first century city. Today, Pompeii provides a laboratory in which we can explore the Mediterranean world in the years leading up to the destruction. In this seminar we will explore Pompeii in depth—its history, geology, graffiti and art, infrastructure, and society. (Counts for Classics majors/minors.)


Latin

ELEMENTARY LATIN (LATN 101)

  • LATN 101.01 (LC)*: MWF 10:00–10:50: Dr. Blanche McCune
  • LATN 101.02: TR 10:50–12:05: Dr. Noelle Zeiner-Carmichael
  • LATN 101.03: MWF 11:00–11:50: Dr. James Lohmar
  • LATN 101.04: MWF 12:00–12:50: Dr. James Lohmar
  • LATN 101.05: MWF 9:00–9:50: TBA

Introduces the fundamental grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of Latin with emphasis on reading comprehension. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.) 

*LATN 101.01 is freshman-only section, part of a First Year Experience Learning Community in partnership with CLAS 102.01

ELEMENTARY LATIN (LATN 102)

  • LATN 102.01: MWF 1:00–1:50: Dr. James Newhard
  • LATN 102.02: MWF 3:00–3:50 Dr. Andrew Alwine

Introduces the fundamental grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of Latin with emphasis on reading comprehension. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

INTERMEDIATE LATIN (LATN 201)

  • LATN 201.01: MWF 11:00–11:50: TBA
  • LATN 201.02: MWF 12:00–12:50: Dr. Blanche McCune
  • LATN 201.03: MWF 2:00–2:50: Dr. James Lohmar

Completes the introduction to basic Latin, developing comprehension in reading and writing. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

INTERMEDIATE LATIN (LATN 202)

  • LATN 202.01: MWF 10:00–10:50: Dr. Allison Sterrett-Krause
  • LATN 202.02: MWF 3:00–3:50: Dr. James Lohmar

Completes the introduction to basic Latin, developing comprehension in reading and writing. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

OVID (LATN 390)

  •  LATN 390.01: TR 9:25–10:40: Dr. Noelle Zeiner-Carmichael

This course explores the poetry of Ovid with particular focus on the poet’s epistolary works. We will read selections from the Heroides, Tristia, and Epistulae Ex Ponto and examine Ovid’s adaptation of the letter-genre for literary, political, and personal purposes. In addition, through our close reading of the text, we will consider thematic topoi such as gender, sexuality, exile, death, and self-fashioning amidst Ovid’s Octavian-Augustus context and the geographical and cultural diversity of Rome’s empire. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.)


Ancient Greek

ELEMENTARY ANCIENT GREEK (GREK 101)

  • GREK 101.01: MWF 9:00–9:50: Dr. Andrew Alwine
  • GREK 101.02: MWF 11:00-11:50: Dr. Scott Hemmenway

Introduces the fundamental grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of Ancient Greek with emphasis on reading comprehension. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

INTERMEDIATE ANCIENT GREEK (GREK 201)

  • MWF 9:00–9:50: Dr. Timothy Johnson  

Transition from grammar to reading texts. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

HOMER (GREK 322) 

  • GREK 322.01: TR 1:40–2:55: Dr. Samuel Flores 

An exploration of Homer’s epic poems with readings selected from the Iliad and/or Odyssey. (Counts for A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.)