Current Offerings

Spring 2021

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Culture: Archaeology, History, Literature, Philosophy, etc.

GREEK CIVILIZATION (CLAS 101)

  • CLAS 101.01: MWF 9:00–9:50: Dr. Samuel Flores
  • CLAS 101.02: MWF 10:00–10:50: Dr. Samuel Flores

This course is an introduction to the world of Ancient Greece, from the Minoans to the Hellenistic Kingdoms. We will read multiple primary sources (Greek poets, philosophers, playwrights, etc.) as we survey the cities and cultures of the Greek world. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.)

CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY (CLAS 103)

  • CLAS 103.01: MWF 11:00–11:50: Dr. Allison Sterrett-Krause
  • CLAS 103.02: MWF 3:00–3:50: Dr. James Lohmar
  • CLAS 103.03: MWF 4:00–4:50: Dr. James Lohmar

Gods, Goddesses, and Monsters—learn about the Greeks and Romans through the stories they told. We’ll study literature and art to understand how people of the ancient Mediterranean worked and worshipped, lived and died, loved and played. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.)

INTRODUCTION TO CLASSICAL ARCHAEOLOGY (CLAS 104)

  • CLAS 104.01: ONLINE (asynchronous): Dr. James Newhard
  • CLAS 104.02: ONLINE (asynchronous): Dr. James Newhard

An introduction to the archaeology of the Classical world, emphasizing the development of archaeology as a discipline and issues such as the recording and interpretation of evidence, the relationship between historical and archaeological events, the integration of archaeology with other forms of evidence, and the use of classical civilization and archaeology in defining the modern world. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors, Archaeology major/minor.)

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY IN GREEK & LATIN (CLAS 111)

  • CLAS 111.01: ONLINE (asynchronous): Mrs. Megan Alwine
  • CLAS 111.02: ONLINE (asynchronous): Mrs. Megan Alwine
  • CLAS 111.03 (Express I): ONLINE (asynchronous): Mrs. Megan Alwine
  • CLAS 111.04 (Express II): ONLINE (asynchronous): Mrs. Megan Alwine

A study of the technical vocabulary of the medical professions through an analysis of Latin and Greek elements in English words and the underlying etymological principles. (Prerequisite accepted course for MUSC.)

INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES (WGST 200)

  • WGST 200.02: ONLINE (asynchronous): Dr. Noelle Zeiner-Carmichael

An interdisciplinary course exploring the rich body of knowledge developed by and about women and gender. We will study gendered structures and their consequences in contemporary cultures, as well as feminist theories and social movements. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, Women's and Gender Studies major/minor.)

ROMAN ART AND ARCHITECTURE (ARTH 215)

  • ARTH 215.01: MWF 12:00–12:50: Dr. Allison Sterrett-Krause           

This course surveys the art of ancient Rome, from the Iron Age through the Late Antique period. The lectures and readings present major works in their historical, political, and cultural contexts--both ancient and modern. This approach will help students understand how ancient Romans viewed and used these artworks. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors, Archaeology major/minor, Art History major/minor.)

THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF ATHENS (CLAS 225)

  • CLAS 225.01: TR 01:40–2:55: Dr. James Newhard

This course is an in-depth discussion of the physical remains of Athens and Attica from the Prehistoric through the Roman periods. Specific focus will be placed upon how this urban and rural landscape contributes to our understanding of social, economic, and political processes through time. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors, Archaeology major/minor.)

ANCIENT ROME (HIST 232)

  • HIST 232.01: TR 8:00–9:15 (synchronous onlne): Dr. Jennifer Gerrish   

The city of Rome grew from a tiny settlement on the Palatine Hill to a mighty empire stretching from Britain to Babylon. This course examines Rome's history from its foundation in 753 BCE to the death of Rome's first Christian emperor in 337 CE. We will explore not just the history of Rome, but also the evidence: how do we know what we think we know about Rome? (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors, History major/minor.)

ANCIENT ROMAN LETTERS (CLAS 356)

  •   CLAS 356.01: TR 10:50–12:05 (sychronous online): Dr. Noelle Zeiner-Carmichael

Students explore the epistolary genre through verse and prose letters written by Cicero, Horace, Pliny and others; selections also include Christian authors and papyrus/tablet artifacts from Egypt and Britain. Areas of examination include literary conventions and themes, daily life and culture, authorial self-fashioning, theoretical approaches, and the intersection between ancient letter-writing and modern electronic communication and social media. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.)

GLASS LAB (CLAS 420)

  • CLAS 420.01: F 2:00–5:00: Dr. Allison Sterrett-Krause

Students work collaboratively with instructor to catalogue, draw, identify, and contextualize fragments of Roman glass excavated in Carthage. Activities include describing and classifying individual fragments, creating profile drawings and digital photographs for archaeological publication, data curation, and researching glass manufacture and use in the Roman and Byzantine periods. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.)


Latin

ELEMENTARY LATIN (LATN 101)

  • LATN 101.01: MWF 11:00–11:50: Dr. Blanche McCune

Introduces the fundamental grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of Latin with emphasis on reading comprehension. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

ELEMENTARY LATIN (LATN 102)

  • LATN 102.01: MWF 10:00–10:50: Dr. Blanche McCune
  • LATN 102.02: MWF 12:00–12:50 (synchronous online): Dr. James Lohmar
  • LATN 102.03: MWF 3:00–3:50: Dr. Andrew Alwine

Introduces the fundamental grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of Latin with emphasis on reading comprehension. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

INTERMEDIATE LATIN (LATN 201)

  • LATN 201.01: MWF 01:00 – 01:50: Dr. James Lohmar

Completes the introduction to basic Latin, developing comprehension in reading and writing. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

INTERMEDIATE LATIN (LATN 202)

  • LATN 202.01: TR 9:25–10:40 (synchronous online): Dr. Noelle Zeiner-Carmichael
  • LATN 202.02: MWF 01:00–01:50: Dr. Blanche McCune

Completes the introduction to basic Latin, developing comprehension in reading and writing. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

ROMAN HISTORIOGRAPHY: TACITUS (LATN 323)

  •  LATN 323.01: TR 9:25–10:40 (synchronous online): Dr. Jennifer Gerrish

Did Nero really fiddle while Rome burned? Is it possible to be a good person under a bad ruler? We read selections from Tacitus' Annals to find out. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.)


Ancient Greek

ELEMENTARY ANCIENT GREEK (GREK 101)

  • GREK 102.01: MWF 10:00–10:50: Dr. Andrew Alwine

Introduces the fundamental grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of Ancient Greek with emphasis on reading comprehension. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

INTERMEDIATE ANCIENT GREEK (GREK 202)

  • TR 12:15–1:30 (synchronous online): Dr. Jennifer Gerrish  

Transition from grammar to reading texts. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

GREEK TRAGEDY (GREK 325) 

  • GREK 325.01: MWF 2:00–3:15: Dr. Samuel Flores 

In this course, we will read the entirety of Euripides' Trojan Women in the original Greek, and discuss the play within its mythological and historical contexts. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.)