Spring 2022

Culture: Archaeology, History, Literature, Philosophy, etc.

GREEK CIVILIZATION (CLAS 101)

  • CLAS 101.01: TR 1:40–2:55: Dr. Samuel Flores

This course is an introduction to the world of Ancient Greece, from the Minoans to the Hellenistic Kingdoms. We will read multiple primary sources (Greek poets, philosophers, playwrights, etc.) as we survey the cities and cultures of the Greek world. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.)

CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY (CLAS 103)

  • CLAS 103.01: MWF 12:00–12:50: Dr. Allison Sterrett-Krause
  • CLAS 103.02: MWF 1:00–1:50: Dr. Allison Sterrett-Krause

Gods, Goddesses, and Monsters—learn about the Greeks and Romans through the stories they told. We’ll study literature and art to understand how people of the ancient Mediterranean worked and worshipped, lived and died, loved and played. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.) 

INTRODUCTION TO CLASSICAL ARCHAEOLOGY (CLAS 104)

  • CLAS 104.01: ONLINE (asynchronous): Dr. James Newhard

An introduction to the archaeology of the Classical world, emphasizing the development of archaeology as a discipline and issues such as the recording and interpretation of evidence, the relationship between historical and archaeological events, the integration of archaeology with other forms of evidence, and the use of classical civilization and archaeology in defining the modern world. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors, Archaeology major/minor.) 

HISTORY OF THE CLASSICAL WORLD (CLAS 105)

  • CLAS 105.01: TR 9:25–10:40: Dr. Allison Kidd

A survey of major developments in the history of Ancient Greece and Rome. Proceeding in chronological order, the course covers more than 2,000 years of history, from the development of Bronze Age civilizations and continuing through the fall of the Roman Empire. Drawing upon diverse primary sources, class sessions will explore developments in political, social, economic, cultural and intellectual history.(Counts for Gen. Ed. Pre-modern History, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.) 

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY IN GREEK & LATIN (CLAS 111)

  • CLAS 111.01: ONLINE (asynchronous): Mrs. Megan Alwine
  • CLAS 111.02: ONLINE (asynchronous): Mrs. Megan Alwine
  • CLAS 111.03: ONLINE (asynchronous): Mrs. Megan Alwine
  • CLAS 111.04: ONLINE (asynchronous): Mrs. Megan Alwine

A study of the technical vocabulary of the medical professions through an analysis of Latin and Greek elements in English words and the underlying etymological principles. (Prerequisite accepted course for MUSC.)

ANCIENT ROME (HIST 232)

  • HIST 232.01: MWF 2:00–2:50: Dr. Andrew Alwine

From humble beginnings – a small city-state in the 8th century B.C. – Rome became the center for a vast empire that forever changed world history. This course is an introduction to the political, social, and cultural history of that civilization. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors, History major/minor.)

IMAGES OF WOMEN IN CLASSICAL ANTIQUITY (CLAS 242)

  • CLAS 242.01: MW 3:25-4:40: Dr. Allison Sterrett-Krause

A survey of the roles of women in classical Greece and Rome. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors)

SOCRATES (CLAS 301 / PHIL 298)

  • CLAS 301.01: TR 10:50–12:05: Dr. Samuel Flores
  • PHIL 298.01: TR 10:50-12:05: Dr. Samuel Flores

This course examines the primary literary and historical sources for the Athenian philosopher Socrates (469–399 BCE). Since Socrates himself did not write anything, we’ll discuss how we know what we know about him, and how we can reconstruct aspects of his life and contribution of Greek philosophy and political thought via contemporary sources. Reading will include philosophic dialogues of Plato, philosophic and historical texts of Xenophon, and the comedies of Aristophanes. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors, cross-listed as PHIL 298 to count for Philosophy major/minor.) 


Latin

ELEMENTARY LATIN (LATN 101)

  • LATN 101.01: TR 9:25-10:40: Dr. Noelle Zeiner-Carmichael
  • LATN 101.02: MWF 9:50–9:50: Dr. Richard Gilder 

Introduces the fundamental grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of Latin with emphasis on reading comprehension. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.) 

ELEMENTARY LATIN (LATN 102)

  • LATN 102.01: MWF 12:00–12:50: Dr. James Newhard
  • LATN 102.02: MWF 1:00–1:50: Dr. Blanche McCune
  • LATN 102.03: TR 12:15-1:30: Dr. Noelle Zeiner-Carmichael
  • LATN 102.04: TR 1:40-2:55: Dr. Noelle Zeiner-Carmichael

Introduces the fundamental grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of Latin with emphasis on reading comprehension. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

INTERMEDIATE LATIN (LATN 201)

  • LATN 201.01: MWF 10:00–10:50: Dr. James Lohmar
  • LATN 201.02: MWF 11:00–11:50: Dr. James Lohmar

Completes the introduction to basic Latin, developing comprehension in reading and writing. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

INTERMEDIATE LATIN (LATN 202)

  • LATN 202.01: MWF 11:00–11:50: Dr. Blanche McCune
  • LATN 202.02: MWF 3:00–3:50: Dr. James Lohmar

Completes the introduction to basic Latin, developing comprehension in reading and writing. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

HORACE'S ODES (LATN 390.01)

  •  LATN 390.01: MWF 10:00-10:50: Dr. Blanche McCune

Horace’s Odes are among the greatest lyric poems ever written. However, because their greatness largely derives from Horace’s careful craftsmanship of a “mosaic of words” (to quote Nietzsche), it is impossible to experience the poems for what they are without reading them in their original Latin. In this course we will read and appreciate the best and most famous of the odes, analyze the collection’s structure and recurring themes, and discuss Horace’s philosophical and political advice for late 20s BC Rome. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.)

PETRONIUS (LATN 390.02)

  •  LATN 390.02: MWF 2:00–2:50: Dr. James Lohmar

Petronius’ Satyricon is a unique document, since it represents one of very few extant ancient novels in Latin. It’s unfortunately highly fragmentary, but the bulk of the remaining text left to us concerns a lavish dinner party in the Bay of Naples commonly titled the Cena Trimalchionis, or The Banquet of Trimalchio. Through careful reading of the Satyricon this class considers a peculiarly Neronian experience of aesthetics, idiomatic vocabulary, and ancient Roman humor. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.)


Ancient Greek

ELEMENTARY ANCIENT GREEK (GREK 102)

  • GREK 102.01: MWF 12:00–12:50: Dr. Scott Hemmenway

Introduces the fundamental grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of Ancient Greek with emphasis on reading comprehension. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

INTERMEDIATE ANCIENT GREEK (GREK 202)

  • GREK 202.01: MWF 1:00–1:50: Dr. Andrew Alwine 

Transition from grammar to reading texts. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

XENOPHON'S ANABASIS (GREK 323) 

  • GREK 323.01: TR 12:15–1:30: Dr. Andrew Alwine

In 401 B.C., a Greek mercenary warrior named Xenophon entered the service of the pretender to the Persian throne named Cyrus. An army of 10,000 Greeks marched into the heartland of the Persian Empire and won the Battle of Cunaxa. But in the battle Cyrus died, and the Greeks found themselves stranded. Without a leader, they had to find a way back to Greece. In this course we will read Xenophon’s eyewitness account of this extraordinary historical event. 

(Counts for A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.)