Fall 2022

Culture: Archaeology, History, Literature, Philosophy, etc.

ROMAN CIVILIZATION (CLAS 102)

  • CLAS 102.01: TR 9:25–10:40: Dr. Allison Kidd
  • CLAS 102.02: TR 1:40–2:55: Dr. Noelle Zeiner-Carmichael

A survey of Roman literature, art, society, and history, from the Etruscan period to the era of Constantine, with an emphasis on the Augustan age. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.)

 

INTRODUCTION TO CLASSICAL ARCHAEOLOGY (CLAS 104)

  • CLAS 104.01: TR 12:15-1:30: Dr. James Newhard

An introduction to the archaeology of the Classical world, emphasizing the development of archaeology as a discipline and issues such as the recording and interpretation of evidence, the relationship between historical and archaeological events, the integration of archaeology with other forms of evidence, and the use of classical civilization and archaeology in defining the modern world. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors, Archaeology major/minor.) 

HISTORY OF THE CLASSICAL WORLD (CLAS 105)

  • CLAS 105.01: TR 8:00–9:15: Dr. Jennifer Gerrish (Learning Community)*

A survey of major developments in the history of Ancient Greece and Rome. Proceeding in chronological order, the course covers more than 2,000 years of history, from the development of Bronze Age civilizations and continuing through the fall of the Roman Empire. Drawing upon diverse primary sources, class sessions will explore developments in political, social, economic, cultural and intellectual history.(Counts for Gen. Ed. Pre-modern History, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.) *CLAS 105.01 is freshman-only section, part of a First Year Experience Learning Community in partnership with LATN 101.01.

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY IN GREEK & LATIN (CLAS 111)

  • CLAS 111.01: ONLINE (asynchronous): Ms. Megan Alwine
  • CLAS 111.02: ONLINE (asynchronous): Ms. Megan Alwine
  • CLAS 111.03: ONLINE (asynchronous): Ms. Megan Alwine
  • CLAS 111.05: ONLINE (asynchronous): Ms. Megan Alwine

A study of the technical vocabulary of the medical professions through an analysis of Latin and Greek elements in English words and the underlying etymological principles. (Prerequisite accepted course for MUSC.)

CONTEMPORARY RESEARCH ON THE MEDITERRANEAN WORLD (CLAS 200)

  • CLAS 200.01: TR 10:40-12:05: Dr. James Newhard

Explores the nature of research of the ancient Mediterranean World, which is grounded in the study of Greco-Roman civilization. Students develop skills necessary for developing and crafting persuasive arguments: analyzing ancient evidence; evaluating scholarly arguments; writing in a process that includes invention, drafting, and revision: and documenting evidence appropriately. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors) 

CLASSICAL HORROR (CLAS 203)

  • CLAS 203.01: MWF 2:00-2:50: Dr. James Lohmar

Horror is a Latin word. How, then, did the ancient Greeks and Romans attempt to generate fear and feeling in their audiences? How does a writer, a playwright, an epic poet attempt to scare audiences while adhering to the generic constraints of their chosen medium? Can we trace a direct line from antiquity to modern film? (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors)

 ANCIENT GREECE (HIST 231)

  • HIST 231.01: MWF 10:00–10:50: Dr. Andrew Alwine

From Greek civilization from its beginnings to Alexander the Great. Emphasis on political, economic, social, and intellectual movements. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors, History major/minor.)

LOVE, BEAUTY, AND SEXUALITY IN THE GRECO-ROMAN WORLD (CLAS 345)

  • CLAS 345.01: TR 9:25–10:40: Dr. Noelle Zeiner-Carmichael

An examination of the relationships between love, beauty, and sexuality in the Greco-Roman world as represented in literary sources and material remains. Genres include philosophy, tragedy, poetry, and letters; thematic topics include physical beauty, divine and physical love, homoeroticism, gender roles, religion, politics, and class. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors, Women's and Gender Studies major/minor.)  

RESEARCH SEMINAR: KILLING AND DYING IN ANCIENT ROME (CLAS 401)

  • CLAS 401.01: TR 12:15–1:30: Dr. Jennifer Gerrish

What did Romans die of? What happened to their bodies and souls, and how did the living commemorate and make sense of their losses? Was Julius Caesar’s death a murder or a tyrannicide, and why does it matter? How did pandemics shape the course of Roman history? Death has many faces, and in this course we will explore Roman conceptions of death as a biological, legal, religious, and cultural phenomenon. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.) 


Latin

ELEMENTARY LATIN (LATN 101)

  • LATN 101.01: MWF 12:00-12:50: Dr. Andrew Alwine (Learning Community)*
  • LATN 101.03: MWF 3:50–3:50: Dr. James Lohmar

Introduces the fundamental grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of Latin with emphasis on reading comprehension. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.) *LATN 101.01 is freshman-only section, a FYE Learning Community in partnership with CLAS 105.01.

ELEMENTARY LATIN (LATN 102)

  • LATN 102.01: MWF 9:00–9:50: Dr. Richard Gilder
  • LATN 102.02: TR 10:50–12:05: Dr. Noelle Zeiner-Carmichael

Introduces the fundamental grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of Latin with emphasis on reading comprehension. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

INTERMEDIATE LATIN (LATN 201)

  • LATN 201.01: MWF 10:00–10:50: Dr. James Lohmar
  • LATN 201.02: MWF 11:00–11:50: Dr. James Lohmar
  • LATN 201.03: MWF 12:00–12:50: Richard Gilder

Completes the introduction to basic Latin, developing comprehension in reading and writing. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

INTERMEDIATE LATIN (LATN 202)

  • LATN 202.01: TR 1:40–2:55: Dr. Blanche McCune

Completes the introduction to basic Latin, developing comprehension in reading and writing. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

VERGIL (LATN 322)

  •  LATN 322.01: MWF 1:00-1:50: Dr. Blanche McCune

Selections from Vergil’s Eclogues, Georgics, and Aeneid, along with a discussion of their contexts, intertexts, and enduring legacy. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.)

ROMAN HISTORIOGRAPHY: CAESAR (LATN 323)

  •  LATN 323.01: TR 9:25–10:40: Dr. Jennifer Gerrish

Readings from Book 1-2 of Julius Caesar's Bellum Gallicum. In addition to refining their Latin skills and exploring the historical, political, and literary context of the BG, students will also have the opportunity to participate in the development and publication of a commentary and translation of BG 1-2. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Humanities, A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.)


Ancient Greek

ELEMENTARY ANCIENT GREEK (GREK 102)

  • GREK 101.01: MWF 11:00-11:50: Dr. Samuel Flores
  • GREK 101.02: MWF 12:00–12:50: Dr. Scott Hemmenway

Introduces the fundamental grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of Ancient Greek with emphasis on reading comprehension. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

INTERMEDIATE ANCIENT GREEK (GREK 201)

  • GREK 201.01: MWF 1:00–1:50: Dr. Samuel Flores

Transition from grammar to reading texts. (Counts for Gen. Ed. Language, A.B. Degree, Classics majors/minors.)

GREEK ORATORY: LYSIAS (GREK 321) 

  • GREK 321.01: MW 2:00–3:15: Dr. Samuel Flores

Select readings from the Athenian speech-writer, Lysias, one of the “Ten Attic Orators.” (Counts for A.B. degree, Classics majors/minors.)